The Health Justice Department works to “reclaim roots, reclaim power.” We reclaim roots by educating on the history of our neighborhoods and culture, promoting cultural health and healing practices, planting trees and growing food, assisting in energy shutoff prevention, building leaders through the Seeds in Concrete curriculum, and reaffirming our responsibility as stewards of our environment. We reclaim power by taking ownership over our natural resources, health, and recreational spaces through a preventative health and environmental justice workshop series and participation in local and statewide policy campaigns (e.g. #GotPower, #GreenliningTheHood #Health4All #CantBreathe #TransformativeClimateCommunities).

Our programs include:

  • Healing Roots: Through the Healing roots program, FFSJ honors those who have lost their lives due to violence by planting life where life was taken. (Gallery of our memorials)
  • Tree Planting / ReLeaf: We plant trees in disadvantaged communities trading gray concrete spaces into vibrant green spaces to promote a canopy of healthy environments and reduce greenhouse gases. (Click here to learn more about how you can get a tree)
  • Brandon Harrison Memorial Garden: The Brandon Harrison Memorial Garden is a healing centered garden where we grow indigenous healing plants and hold community workshops and healing ceremonies.
  • Seeds in Concrete: A workshop that teaches youth and formerly incarcerated about life skills and emotional regulation skills while learning how to cultivate the relationship to land, relationship to self, and relationship to the community.
  • Environmental Justice Workshops / Citizen Science: A workshop series to learn about environmental (in)justices and how to document stories and data of environmental toxins in their homes and neighborhood through citizen science tools such as home air monitoring, community mapping, and participatory action research.
  • Energy Shutoff Prevention: Assistance with PG&E Utility Shutoffs. In conjunction with The Utility Reform Network FFSJ works to help those impacted by utility shutoffs, by working with PG&E to lower the cost of bills and keep the lights on. (Check out our #GotPower campaign video)
  • Transformative Climate Communities: Work in a coalition of organizations and the City of Stockton to organize and plan environmental justice workshops and community engagement to create a sustainable neighborhood plan, train up community empowerment ambassadors, and put on the first Stockton Climate Leaders’ Conference.
  • Health care access: Advocating for expanded health care to all through the #Health4All campaign, assistance in MediCal enrollments, health and screening fairs, and connecting residents to healthcare through the Doctors of Color campaign
  • Preventative health education: Holding workshops around preventative health practices through community health connectors and promoting culturally-rooted health practices.
  • Policy AdvocacyWe advocate on policies that affect all residents of Stockton and the greater San Joaquin county are, including but not limited to park reinvestment, coastal conservancy, and the reduction of greenhouse gases. We are currently part of the CPENH Having Our Say coalitions, the CA Parks Now Coalition, and Healthy Neighborhoods Collaborative.  

Our Impact:

  • We have planted over 114 trees in disadvantaged communities in South Stockton
  • We have helped prevent over 75 plus PG&E Shutoffs in 2018 during the hottest and coldest seasons of the year

Father’s & Families Free Tree Give Away and Planting:

Need a Tree? Look no further! Just Simply fill out the application below or you can download the form here: FFSJ Free Tree Application

Free Tree

Father's & Families of San Joaquin is giving and planting free trees to families residing in the following zip codes: 95202, 95203, 95205, 95206 and 95215... If you have any more questions please contact Anthony Robinson (209) 405-7532 or email him at arobinson@ffsj.org
    You can select up to five trees. Trees are available per supply
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